Slow Economy | People senryu poem example | 022809

Slow
economy – Time for
a walk

Ken Wagner on Haiku Habits

Advertisements

5 thoughts on “Slow Economy | People senryu poem example | 022809

  1. And it looks like you may be in for a pretty long hike!

    Ken, I’m interested that you’re on Twitter but *don’t* tweet your work. As someone who *does* tweet their stuff, but has mixed feelings about it, I’d love to know your thoughts on that issue.

    • I’ve thought a lot about this issue, Brian. I am generally an open-source kind of guy, but my feeling is that you need to provide your own home for your own work.

      Although Twitter may provide content rights to the poster, and even though copyright may be enforceable on a short poem (as if anything were enforceable on the internet!), users are still subject to the rules Twitter sets for its servers. Last time I checked, each account as a 3,000 Tweet limit. After that – poof.

      Ah, the impermanence of poetry.

      Dave and others guard against this by posting simultaneously on another service – Tumblr, etc. – for archival purposes.

      My other reason for posting my work on Haiku Habits has to do with building a location for sustained practice and feedback. Twitter’s character limit is perfect for micropoems, but terrible for thoughtful commentary and criticism, which are absolutely necessary if a poet is serious about sharing for the purpose of growing.

      Then there are the advantages of being able to study your stats – a click is worth a thousand words. Twitter doesn’t (yet) offer a way to understand what people are clicking on and linking to.

      I publish using a Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike license, so I certainly don’t mind if others post my work on Twitter, Open Micro, etc., but I tend to use these services for promoting my own work, enjoying the poems others post, giving (short) feedback, and learning from / meeting really interesting people.

      Great question. I’m curious what other people think.

  2. I just Twiiter to see how many people follow and then note how dead people (like Lee Marvin and T S Eliott) and people who couldn’t possibly be interested in my stuff because they follow hundreds or thousands find and follow. It’s a bizarre little sharing and networking experiment. But Twitter for me is more 1 way, whereas I get a lot more feedback on the blog (which possibly less people get to see). Just play, really.

    Btw, like Slow.

  3. Really helpful answer, Ken, you’ve pointed up several issues I hadn’t even considered.

    I find another problem with Twitter is that delineating line breaks with a ‘/’ just isn’t as appealling as having proper line breaks.

    I would much prefer people to go to my blog, so as a kind of ‘middle way’ I’ve decided to post a reasonably high percentage (1 in 4) of untweeted poems on my blog, and hope that encourages people to choose that over my Twitterstream.

    At this stage, though, I’m not bold enough to go blog-only, like you!

    Envious of Comradeharps’ prestigious following – TS Eliot has thus far given me a miss. Inspirational preachers and marketing gurus are the ones I have to keep batting off!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s